Peter Brown: BSA’s backroom boy

British Sidecar Champion in 1968 he may have been, but it was bad luck and worse timing that robbed Peter Brown of the greater success he undoubtedly deserved. Pete Crawford spoke to the man himself and discovered the ins and outs while discussing life at BSA, passenger-ing for a U-boat cook and winning the TT.

Cascades, Oulton Park, 1966. Peter leads Norman Hanks. Note the extended screen and committed eyes from the white BSA boys!

“Actually I was educated at the same school as Doug Hele, which was Kings Norton Grammar and I thought the war was bloody wonderful. We all did. We lived on a hillock looking down to Bourneville, where Cadbury was, and one day a twin engine bomber, most probably a Heinkel 111, came across level with our house dropping bombs closely followed by what I suspect was a Hurricane, which shot it down.

“I had a cousin who fought in Hurricane squadron 501. Squadron Leader Kenneth Lee. He was my hero and I was going to be a fighter pilot you see, but as I grew older I realised they were never going to have me, and that was a turning point. It was a case of: ‘I can’t be a fighter pilot so just what can I be?’”

It was a trip to the 1949 TT, paid for by his mother on the understanding that he passed his school certificate, which changed everything. The likes of Ernie Lyons, Johnny Lockett and Freddie Frith in full flight left a profound impression.

Careers advice was against it but two years in a local engineering apprenticeship and night school led to work at Copes of Bearwood, County Cycles and PJ Evans working on parts for Bentleys, among others. Ultimately it secured a place at Ariel’s.

“I worked under Len Moss, in the service department and served my time with various fitters, ending up with the guy who did the square fours, Sammy Peter. He was meticulous and a stickler for discipline, which was very good learning for me. I got to working on my own and filling in here and there and I’d started scrambling and trials, as one could purchase bits at very reasonable prices. Actually the prices were ridiculous!

Read more in the March/April issue of CR – out now!

Comments

comments